What is dyslexia?

Ace Updated by Ace

Dyslexia is often thought of as a disorder in which readers see letters or words backwards when, in fact, dyslexics see words the way everyone else does. Dyslexics struggle to process and manipulate the sounds in words. When reading, those with dyslexia need to decode every word, or part of a word, they read. Reading is therefore laborious and time consuming, making it harder to keep up with peers who do not need to decode as they go.

It is commonly known that the brain is divided into two hemispheres, right and left. The left hemisphere is responsible for analytic thought, language, and reading. The right is responsible for spatial activities, creativity, and intuition. Dyslexics rely more on their right hemisphere and frontal lobe. For those with dyslexia, the process of reading takes a longer pathway through the brain and frontal lobe, causing reading to be more difficult. 

The good news is that brains adapt. With sufficient practice, everyone can learn to read.

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